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Category Archives: trends

This 19-Year-Old Developer Is So Successful, He Turned Down Apple

Last week, 19-year-old John Meyer dropped out of a prestigious university computer science program to work full-time on his tech startup, Fresco News.

His parents weren’t happy at first. He was attending NYU where his mom is a professor, he told Business Insider.

But they eventually came around to support him, because they had to admit: Meyer is already a successful independent computer programmer. He’s been writing apps since his freshman year in high school, 2008, after teaching himself the programming language Objective C.

And he’s been making money at it since his sophomore year of high school, he says.

“Money-wise, I’ve been pretty fortunate. I’ve been able to support myself since just a year after I got started,” he said.

 
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Posted by on September 28, 2014 in education, money, think, trends

 

Olive Garden Is Evidence Of A Huge Problem In The Economy…

Struggling are Olive Garden and Red Lobster, which are largely geared toward middle-class customers, who have been squeezed during the recession and slow recovery. Families with young children cut back on restaurant spending during the downturn, and they haven’t come back, according to a recent survey by restaurant research firm NPD Group.

Same-store sales, a measure of performance at restaurants open a year or more, dropped 3.5 percent at Olive Garden and 5.6 percent at Red Lobster over the quarter. At Long Horn Steak House, Darden’s middle-of-the-road steak chain, same-store sales rose 2.4 percent, but traffic — the measure of how many people are actually coming through the door — dropped over the quarter.

On the other hand, at Darden’s Capital Grille, where most dinner entrees fetch more than $40 each, same-store sales increased 4 percent over the quarter. That makes sense, too: Over the past few years, the kinds of people who can afford a fancy dinner have seen their incomes grow, even as everybody else’s incomes have stayed flat.

 

read more…

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2014 in business, food, trends

 

Chipotle Mexican Grill knows how to do food business

Chipotle Mexican Grill’s assembly-line business model of slinging burritos and carnitas had a banner day on Wall Street. As the much of the market saw increased volatility Friday, Chipotle saw record highs, boosted by much better-than-expected earnings.

Much of the company’s solid growth came from its ability to quickly serve long lines of hungry customers during peak rush hours, a concept known as throughput, said Stephen Anderson, a restaurant analyst with Miller Tabak & Co. The efficiency at which customers move through Chipotle lines during busy hours seems to be increasing, he said.

Check out the CNBC video

What separates Chipotle from peers?
Over the last five years, Chipotle’s stock has surged an incredible 1,030% as the company has become one of the largest restaurants by market capitalization in the market. The reasons for its success during this period are plentiful, but they can be traced back to three core explanations.

1. Chipotle was one of the first fast-casual restaurants and really formed the business model for the segment, which is growing three to five times faster than any other segment in the restaurant industry in any given quarter.

2. Product Innovation: Chipotle continues to add new foods to its menu, and it has successfully grown beyond Mexican food into Asian food. It is now bringing its fast-casual business model to the pizza industry. Thus, Chipotle’s growth has never been an issue.

3. Organic and healthy focus: Many thought healthy consumption was a fad, but it has proven to be a long-term lifestyle that Chipotle’s peers are now racing to satisfy. Chipotle saw this trend coming, and it has positioned its menus to meet this need.

Is Chipotle still the BEST?

Fast Casual Versus Fast Food

One trend that you might want to take notice of is the shift from quick-service (fast food) and casual dining restaurants to fast casual restaurants.

For proof, consider a recent quote from Bonnie Briggs, an NPD restaurant industry analyst:

“Overall, restaurant customers are trading down, foregoing some of their visits to full service places while increasing the number of visits made to fast casual restaurants. Fast casual concepts are capturing market traffic share by meeting consumers’ expectations, while midscale and casual dining places continue to lose share.”

Fast casual vs. fast food

Fast food is the same thing as quick-service. The name has been changed to “quick-service restaurants” due to the negative connotation associated with the phrase “fast food.”

 

According to the NPD Group (a global information company), the foodservice industry still hasn’t recovered from the recession. Still, the fast casual dining space has performed well. In 2013, fast casual restaurant visits increased 8% versus 2012. If that’s not impressive enough, spending at fast casual restaurants jumped 10% over 2012. Comparatively, total spending at all restaurants improved just 2%.

The reason for the superior performance has to do with better service than fast food restaurants and more affordability than casual dining restaurants. Food served at fast casual restaurants is believed to be fresher than what you find at fast food restaurants.

The chart below shows the difference between fast food foot traffic and fast casual foot traffic since 2009 — all numbers are year over year:

Year Fast Food Traffic Fast Casual Traffic
2009 Down 3% Up 4%
2010 Down 1% Up 6%
2011 Flat Up 6%
2012 Up 1% Up 9%
2013 Flat Up 8%

As you can see, the fast casual space is growing at a decent clip. Also, keep in mind that the average check size is higher at fast casual restaurants than at fast food restaurants: $7.40 vs. $5.30. The average check at full-service restaurants is $13.66, but that doesn’t mean much without increased traffic.

Part of the reason for growth in the fast casual space is increased unit growth. For instance, fast casual units grew 6% to 16,215 in 2013. This might make the numbers above seem skewed, but only restaurants that are bullish about their futures will add more locations. Restaurant chains that are struggling will close locations to free up cash flow to pay off debt or reinvest that capital into better-performing locations.

Panera Bread and Chipotle Mexican Grill are the top performers in the space, but is one a better option than the other?

More details here

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2014 in business, food, trends

 

Denmark bans kosher and halal slaughter

The change to the law, announced last week and effective as of yesterday, has been called “anti-Semitism” by Jewish leaders and “a clear interference in religious freedom” by the non-profit group Danish Halal.

European regulations require animals to be stunned before they are slaughtered, but grants exemptions on religious grounds. For meat to be considered kosher under Jewish law or halal under Islamic law, the animal must be conscious when killed.

more details at independent

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2014 in economy, think, tourism, trends

 

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WHATSAPP FOUNDER WAS REJECTED FOR JOB BY FACEBOOK AND TWITTER

  • Jan Koum, 37, moved to California from the Ukraine when he was 16
  • Founded mobile chat-app WhatsApp with Brian Acton in 2009
  • Koum has known Mark Zuckerberg ‘for a long time’, Facebook CEO said
  • Acton was rejected by Facebook and Twitter in 2009
  • Koum signed $19bn deal at welfare center where he used to collect handouts

READ THE rest of story at Daily mail

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2014 in technology, think, trends

 

rich people’s pets enjoy luxury treatment

Dubai Dogs and Cats enjoying luxury life

Disney World’s luxury pet resort

And to put it more bluntly <<Saeen ka kutta bhi saeen>> (loose translation: my lord’s dog is also my lord)

 
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Posted by on February 19, 2014 in tourism, trends

 

Wounds or Cuts avoid stitches use Super Glue

Can you use Super Glue to close cuts!!!

This article is for information only and not a medical advice. Please consult your doctor for medical advice.

During the Vietnam War, emergency medics began using the all-purpose glue to seal battle wounds in troops headed for surgery. The glue was so good at stemming bleeding that it was credited with saving many lives.

Nowadays, professional athletes often close small cuts with Super Glue or similar products to get back in the game in a hurry. The glues are also used by veterinarians, and many people keep a tube around the house to help them out of a medical pinch. It is believed that the glues — made from the chemical cyanoacrylate — not only stop bleeding quickly, but also lead to less scarring.

So should you keep some Super Glue in the medicine cabinet? Probably not, experts say. Studies show that although the glue can be useful in emergencies, it can also irritate the skin, kill cells and cause other side effects, particularly when used on deep wounds.

Wound adhesives are generally only used on minor wounds, no more than 5cm and with straight edges. Do not attempt to use glue on the following:

  • wounds on the face
  • wounds where the skin flexes or over joints
  • wounds with uneven or jagged edges
  • deep wounds
  • wounds that are bleeding
  • infected wounds
  • animal bites
  • puncture wounds
  • ulcers
  • dirty wounds

All Super Glues are not the same.

“Super Glue” or Cyanoacrylate (CA) is an acrylic resin which rapidly polymerises in the presence of water. The principle component of commercial CAs (SuperGlue, Krazy Glue, Loctite) is either methy-2-cyanoacrylate or ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate, the original forms of CA developed in 1942 by Kodak Laboratories. (The discovery was made whilst investigating potential, high clarity, acrylics for the use in gun sights. Whilst not suitable for this application CA was quickly identified as a fast acting, low shear strength adhesive.)

During the Vietnam war it was used in field surgery with good effect, however, despite the promising results it was not approved by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration due to the unknown toxicity and two significant side effects during the polymerization process:

  1. The curing process creates an exothermic reaction (heat) which can cause further tissue damage.
  2. The process releases cyanoacetate and formaldehyde – both irritants to the eyes, nose, throat and lungs.

Medical Glue

To overcome these harmful issues, new CAs were developed with the express purpose of use in surgery. 2-octyl cyanoacrylate(Derma+flex® QS™, SurgiSeal, FloraSeal and Dermabond) causes less skin irritation and increased flexibility and strength compared to traditional ‘Super Glue’. In 1998 the US FDA approved 2-octyl cyanoacrylate for the closure of wounds and surgical incision and in 2001 was approved as “barrier against common bacterial microbes including certain staphylococci, pseudomonads, and Escherichia coli”.

n-butyl cyanoacrylate wound adhesives are available under the trade names: LiquiBand®, Histoacryl, Indermil, GluStitch, GluShield, andPeriacryl (dental adhesive)

Octyl ester, while providing a weaker bond, are more flexible. Butyl esters provide stronger bond, but are rigid.

A cheaper alternative…Veterinary Glues

If you are looking for something for your personal first aid kit and don’t fancy spending £120 on 6 x 5ml vials of Derma Bond, veterinary glues are commercially available as a happy compromise; not licensed for use on humans but essentially the same stuff in a different wrapper.

2-octyl cyanoacrylate Surgi-Lock and Nexaband
n-butyl cyanoacrylate VetGluVetbond and LiquiVet

Here are some videos:

SurgiSeal

derma-flex

 
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Posted by on December 29, 2013 in health, trends

 
 
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